FEATURED INGREDIENT: TIGERNUT ROUND-UP

Every month, Getting Primal will feature one not-so-commonly used ingredient in everyday recipes and showcase Paleo-friendly recipes which incorporate it. For the month of January, tigernuts are featured.
 
By Marco Schmidt [1] (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Our daughter Kiarra cannot tolerate dairy and so I figured one day I would attempt to make almond milk. Almond milk was not a hit with our kids and to be honest, I do not care much for the taste of almond milk either. So when I found out tigernuts which the kids love snacking on could be turned into a milk as well, I knew I had to give it a try.

Tigernuts are actually not nuts. They are a vegetable - a tuber. They are known to be allergen-free (to this day, there are no known allergies surrounding these tubers), high in fiber, and are a good source of healthy fats. The recipes containing tigernuts or tigernut flour are few and far between but I still managed to find some enticing recipes incorporating this not-so-common ingredient.

Tigernuts are mildly sweet and creamy tasting so using them to make Kunnu Aya (Nigerian-style Tigernut Milk) works beautifully. I have made this recipe without using the cardamom pods or jaggery and my two younger kids took to it quite well. I slowly started adding it to our toddler Seamus' goats milk in an effort to someday wean him off goat's milk altogether, and he has not minded it at all. I tasted it myself and just like tigernuts, the milk imparts a sweet and silky taste.

Who's in the mood for pancakes? I guess a better question would be - who isn't? Here's a pancake recipe which incorporates tigernut flour. I have not yet tried making this recipe. Tigernut flour is mildly sweet and has a nutty flavour to it so I can only imagine it would make an excellent addition to a pancake recipe. Lauren of Empowered Sustenance does warn of a slightly gritty texture associated with using tigernut flour in recipes. She mentions it is neither a bad or good thing but does depend on your preference. An allergen-free recipe packed with the irresistibly sweet nutty taste of tigernuts and not to mention the health benefits associated with this power-packed tuber makes it a recipe worth trying!
 





Tigernut Flour
by Empowered Sustenance



 

Miss oatmeal? My kids used to eat oatmeal before we switched to Paleo most mornings. Who can forget the many trainers and health-gurus who espouse eating oatmeal for breakfast to get your day started off right? It is possible to still eat oatmeal when Paleo...well, without the oats of course! This power-packed recipe for Banana Tiger Nut N'Oatmeal incorporates tigernut flour, coconut flakes, banana, coconut milk, and cauliflower rice...whaaaa...cauliflower you say??? In my opinion, just another great way to sneak vegetables into my kids' diet every morning. The tigernut flour gives this N'oatmeal a subtly sweet and nut-like taste.
 





Banana Tiger Nut N'Oatmeal
​by the Paleo Partridge


 

Last but not least, I cannot forget the blogger who introduced me to the healthy goodness of tigernuts to begin with - Dora Siah of Provincial Paleo. She runs a blog showcasing AIP-compliant recipes worth checking out and has already produced several recipes with tigernuts, published one in the e-book 85 AIP Amazing Breakfasts, and has other tigernut recipes in the works! This woman is a tigernut aficionado. I highly recommend visiting her website for tigernut flour ideas, and other delicious AIP recipes.

Check out her cookie recipe which involves tigernut flour, avocado, and blackstrap molasses (what a creatively divine combination!) and her maple mug cake which combines the healthy goodness of tigernut flour and the velvety sweet taste of maple syrup...this woman is a tigernut genius! 





 



Soft and Chewy Molasses Cookies
by Provincial Paleo







 





AIP Maple Mug Cake
by Provincial Paleo










 
​Still not sure if you want to try tigernuts in your recipes? Of course it would be a good idea first to try munching on some whole tigernuts to get an idea of how they taste. In Canada, they are usually available in health food stores (the health food store near our place will order them for us so you may want to try inquiring with a health food store near you). They are also available at times in bulk food stores like Bulk Barn. They are also available to order online. So, munch away, try these recipes, and let me know what you think of these super-tubers!

 
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